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peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,
During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experience Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  
The Germans didn’t allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.
 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own buy cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.
The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.
peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,
During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experience Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  
The Germans didn’t allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.
 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own buy cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.
The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.
peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,
During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experience Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  
The Germans didn’t allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.
 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own buy cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.
The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.
peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,
During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experience Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  
The Germans didn’t allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.
 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own buy cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.
The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.

peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,

During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experience Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  

The Germans didn’t allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.

 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own buy cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.

The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.

mutantsquidink asked:

About the new Female!Thor thing, wasn't that joked about in the Femme Fatal episode of PPG where the titular villain complained about female comic book characters being nothing more than copy/paste extensions of their male counterparts?

poppypicklesticks:

Yes.  Its amazing how so many feminists spectacularly miss the point of that episode.   I always picture this scene when Anita is ever mentioned:

Female gamer: Was Anita looking out for me when she became a living embodiment of the fake girl gamer stereotype?

Female let’s player: Was Anita looking out for me when she stole my footage?

Female artist: Was Anita looking out for me when she stole my artwork?

Female game designer: Was Anita looking out for me when she ignored my game and came up with idiotic reasons why my female characters were misogynist stereotypes since I invalidated her narrative?

poppypicklesticks:

disneyvillainsforjustice:

sosungalittleclodofclay:

harlequinhatter:

roughstar:

sleepsolatecuzivegotsomanydreams:

ohioisloko:

thedailysadclub:

maggie00love:

Boys hurt too

i am absolutely terrified and horrified by this

that’s because with boys a chemical is released in their brain when they make the decision and boys are more likely to hang or shoot themselves, so it always gets done first try. Meanwhile, girls tend to cut and mostly take pills, a method easier to mess up and easier to be saved, thus more attempts and less effect.

Yeah, but boys hurt too

Also boys are a lot less likely to chicken out
Statistics say that more males go through with suicide attempts than females

You know how radfems get mad when guys “hijack a post”

Welp.

"released a chemical in the brain"

no.

androgens mask ‘classic’ depression symptoms, which leads to signs known as “male pattern” depression

http://www.professionalpsychiatry.com/depression.html

Male pattern depression can include signs seen infrequently in women:

  • Lower stress threshold
  • Aggressive behavior or difficulty controlling impulses
  • Irritability, restlessness, dissatisfaction
  • Anxiety, especially in the morning
  • Alcohol abuse or illegal drug use
  • Excessive exercise or work
  • Hyperactive behavior
  • Eating too little or too much
  • Antisocial behavior and/or pushing or testing social norms

This, by the by, is the cause of ‘the depression gap’. There actually aren’t more depressed women than men, it’s just that in men it presents as other disorders.

the other problem men and boys aren’t given the mental skills to impart their needs, let alone expect them to be met. It would help if people started giving a shit.

This makes me very sad. Especially since when a boy/man gets sad and/or depressed they are told to “man up” and “get over it”, which ends up in them bottling up and suppressing all of their emotions, which can have devastating effects.
- Mod Helga

not to mention this is how feminists reacted when someone tried to give a lecture where this was one of the topics to be discussed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iARHCxAMAO0

holy-mountaineering:

non-volerli-vittime:

darkdungeonsthemovie:

How much would you like it if playing RPGs led you to be initiated into a cult of real magic? Not very much, we imagine.

Please SHARE this image, to spread the word about the true dangers of gaming!

Order your digital copy (http://bit.ly/1plDAaW) or DVD (http://bit.ly/UuyCw1) of Dark Dungeons now…

One day I was playing a rpg, and the next I was stealing goats to sacrifice to Lucifer with my friends. The dangers are real.

All I know is that I was playing Pokeman cards one minute and the next minute my pant leg was riding up my leg, I had a noose around my neck, and I was being lead at sword point to the Hierophant of the West…

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